FOODIES WEST.COM         

 
VINCENT GUERITHAULT
OWNER/EXECUTIVE CHEF

Michelin 3-Star (trained) | Mobil 4-Star
James Beard Foundation Best Chef Southwest | International Food & Wine Society Citation of Excellence
Officier in L'Ordre du Merite Agricole
VINCENT ON CAMELBACK
Phoenix, Arizona

  You don't know what the American Dream is until you try and see.

April 2018 Issue | Vol. 6, No. 12
















 

 






 
 
 
 

 
Executive Chef
THE ARIZONA BILTMORE
PHOENIX, ARIZONA

HERVE CUYEU

 
Executive Chef
TORO Latin Restaurant
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

FERNANDO FERNANDEZ

 
Chef de Cuisine

WRIGHT'S at
the BILTMORE
PHOENIX, ARIZONA
BRIAN PETERSON

 
THE LATIN TABLE
by Chef Isabel Cruz

Isabel's Cantina & Barrio Star


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HENDRICK'S GIN
with Mark Stoddard

WEST COAST AMBASSADOR 



     
Toro Latin Restaurant
& Rum Bar
  
with Executive Chef
Fernando Fernandez
Scottsdale, Arizona

 
Tequila Goddess 

LA HACIENDA at  
FAIRMONT SCOTTSDALE PRINCESS
KATIE SCHNURR

 
MEZZACORONA
PINOT GRIGIO

with Lucio Matricardi, PhD


View the wines, spirits, and beers chefs and sommeliers have paired with food featured in FOODIES WEST:



            


            


             

           
 
           
Vincent Guerithault| Owner/Executive Chef | Vincent on Camelback in Phoenix, Arizona The American Dream. It’s been called alive and well, a nightmare, rags to riches, opportunity, a marketing scam, freedom, and designated places like El Dorado, Los Angeles, and New York City. Whatever (and wherever) it is, it worked for Vincent Guerithault. He came to America from France with a just few hundred dollars and a boatload of talent. He worked hard, racked up notable awards, and ended up owning one of Phoenix, Arizona’s most beloved restaurants. But it wasn’t, he admits, easy. “It takes a long time before you really love what you’re doing,” Guerithault said. “It’s not fun in the beginning. It’s not fun for many years. It’s not school. You’re getting paid to go to school. You’re getting paid six dollars a month to work eighty hours a week. You go to work at eight o’clock in the morning, you take a break at two-thirty, three o’clock, and you go back at five o’clock, and you’re done at ten-thirty or eleven o’clock. And, of course, you don’t work more than that because you don’t know anything. You’re not really cooking. They don’t let you cook because you don’t know how.” And that was only the beginning. He started out at Oustau de Baumanière in Provence, north of Marseille. The venue had a Michelin three-star rating at the time.