FOODIES WEST.COM         

 
TORO LATIN RESTAURANT & RUM BAR
a Richard Sandoval collaboration
with EXECUTIVE CHEF FERNANDO FERNANDEZ

Scottsdale, Arizona

  Good things happen when the kitchen listens.

May 2018 Issue | Vol. 6, No. 16





















 
 
 
 

 
Executive Chef
TORO Latin Restaurant
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

FERNANDO FERNANDEZ

 
Chef de Cuisine

UME at
Casino del Sol
TUCSON, ARIZONA
DAVID SOLÓRZANO

 
Executive Pastry Chef
HYATT REGENCY SCOTTSDALE

MARTIN NAKATSU

 
STOIC CIDER
with Founders Kanin Routson, PhD and Cody Routson, PhD

Prescott, Arizona


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THE LATIN TABLE
by Chef Isabel Cruz

Isabel's Cantina & Barrio Star

 
FLOR DE CAÑA RUM

Brand Ambassador West

ASHELA RICHARDSON

 
Uncommon Spirits from Well-known Brands 

GARY SPADAFORE
Breakthru Beverage AZ


 
Part 2: Uncommon Spirits from Well-known Brands 

GARY SPADAFORE
Breakthru Beverage AZ



View the wines, spirits, and beers chefs and sommeliers have paired with food featured in FOODIES WEST:



            


            


            
 
           
Toro Latin Restaurant & Rum Bar in Scottsdale, Arizona with Executive Chef Fernando Fernandez Authors have penned it, speakers repeat it, and businesses daily prove it: Good things don’t come easy. They didn’t, initially, at Toro Latin Restaurant. Those wonderful pan-Latin flavors of rich dimension that appeared from celebrity chef Richard Sandoval’s restaurant’s start didn’t make a ready connection with the locals. “To get to this restaurant,” Toro’s executive chef, Fernando Fernandez, mentioned the obvious, “where people know us, was difficult because we are on the golf course. So they didn’t know we were here.” That would be the Scottsdale TPC (Tournament Players Club) golf course that hosts the world’s best golfers and draws admirable recreation golfers. Toro’s patio would give them a stunning view of the course while its Latin food and Rum Bar would give them something new to talk about. Next, the front and back of the house had to get coordinated. “In the beginning,” Fernandez said, “I had to be here every single minute in the kitchen to make sure everyone was doing what they were supposed to do. Now, they’re working together as a team. I don’t even need to be here some days. I don’t go home and get scared, Oh my God, they’re going to call me. It took about a year not to feel that.” And the food—no chimichangas, nor burritos. Furthermore, what’s a Pisco Sour? And what’s with the sushi? “They didn’t get the concept,” Fernandez said, “or they were afraid to try something new here. So the first year, it was really hard to put our food on the market. There were no complaints, but people were afraid.” And then the kitchen decided to listen.