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   STRANGE CRAFT BEER COMPANY


with Tim Myers
Founder/Head Brewer
Denver, Colorado

Brewing small batches and adding bizarre ingredients has never been foreign to us.


October 2017 Issue | Vol. 5, No. 19 















 
 
 
 


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ALFRED MURO


Tim Myers shares one of his  strangest experiments that actually turned out really good on our

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Strang Craft Beer Company with Founder Tim Myers | Denver, Colorado Eric Clapton, Stanley Kubrick, and craft beer. How strange a combination is that? It all makes sense in Tim Myers’ world, where off the wall works. “We’ve always been about experimenting,” Myers said about the beers he creates. “Trying new things. We opened on a one-barrel system. Brewing small batches and adding bizarre ingredients has never been foreign to us. If it doesn’t turn out, it’s only thirty gallons. You just dump it. That’s what the drain is for.” Like what happened to the radish saison they made about four years ago. Myers dumped that one. “It was really funny,” Myers said. “The day that we tasted it and dumped it, there was a picture on the cover of Beer Advocate magazine of a guy holding a handful of radishes and a growler. I thought, Ooo, I know what that beer’s going to taste like. It’s going to smell like week-old mop water, and it’s going to taste like radish soup. There’s a reason why it has that little bite to it. There’s definitely some chemistry there that we didn’t account for. But it’s all right. It was worth a try.” The propensity for peculiar comes from Myers’ curiosity in making things work. The former IT Tech for the Rocky Mountain News managed all the telecom—the phones, the network wiring. “Twenty-four-seven-three-sixty-five,” Myers said. “I always joked I was working doctor’s hours but I wasn’t getting doctor’s wages.” The Rocky folded in 2009, and getting a comparable job in the middle of The Great Recession didn’t look promising. Myers figured he’d either come up with a Plan B or get in line with everyone else. “The brewery was Plan B,” Myers said, “and it’s worked out for the last seven years. It’s been great.” By that time, Myers had been home brewing for about a dozen years. Even then, strange was normal.