FOODIES WEST.COM         

 
STOIC CIDER 
Prescott, Arizona 
with founders Kanin Routson, PhD & Cody Routson, PhD

Two scientists' passion for wild heritage apple trees leads to some totally civilized cider.

We are shifting from how to make really good cider—I think we’ve gone through those hoops—to now we’re learning how to educate people and what is really good cider.
 

August 2018 Issue | Vol. 6, No. 22 





























 
 
 
 

 
Executive Pastry Chef
HYATT REGENCY SCOTTSDALE

MARTIN NAKATSU

 
Chef de Cuisine

UME at
Casino del Sol
TUCSON, ARIZONA
DAVID SOLÓRZANO

 
Executive Chef

CASINO DEL SOL TUCSON 
RYAN CLARK

 
Uncommon Spirits from Well-known Brands 

GARY SPADAFORE
Breakthru Beverage AZ



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M.F.K. FISHER
Food writer extraordinaire

     
PY Steakhouse  
with Chef de Cuisine 
Roderick LeDesma
Tucson, Arizona

 
THE LATIN TABLE
by Chef Isabel Cruz

Isabel's Cantina & Barrio Star

 
Part 2: Uncommon Spirits from Well-known Brands 

GARY SPADAFORE
Breakthru Beverage AZ



View the wines, spirits, and beers chefs and sommeliers have paired with food featured in FOODIES WEST on our new page:



            


            


             
 
           
Stoic Cider, Prescott, Arizona with Kanin Routson and Cody Routson: In search of the wild heritage apple.
Discovering the highest use of the apple did not come quickly for brothers Kanin and Cody Routson. Kanin called it, “an evolutionary process, I guess.” Cody, the younger of the two, followed his brother’s lead. “Mom and Dad worked the land,” Kanin Routson started the story, “and we were very interested in helping them. We grew up growing crops. I had a vegetable garden from when I was, I don’t know, five-years-old. Around 13, I started spending more time off the farm and going to school and things like that. I started planting fruit trees.” A word about “Mom and Dad”: Rebecca and Don Routson moved from Wyoming in the early 80s and bought 40-acres of high desert originally homesteaded in 1913 sitting atop the Chino Aquifer in Williamson Valley, Arizona. They started organic farming and raised grass-fed beef. Rebecca taught small-scale agriculture classes at Prescott College, Don, a skilled artisan who worked outside the home, built the family’s thin-shelled concrete dome home. He handcrafted all the cabinetry and wooden furniture and made the mill that cut the 400-year-old juniper trees used in the project. His paintings and sculptures appear around the home. “We were also inspired by a lot of the historic trees around here,” Cody Routson added. “When the first settlers came in the late 1800s, early 1900s. They planted a lot of fruit trees. Pear trees, apple trees. Those trees are still out on the landscape. We’d be working for the neighboring ranches and came across these orchards in canyons the middle of nowhere. Nowhere. No water, just flourishing trees. They were in rough condition, but they were still alive. They were out there, and they were producing fruit.” These bold, resilient, and determined trees intrigued the brothers.