FOODIES WEST.COM         

 EXECUTIVE CHEF PAUL MILLIST
  

JW MARRIOTT CAMELBACK INN
in Scottsdale, Arizona

  My mum came out with the classic line, I still remember it, 'Oh, chefs make a lot of money.' Do they? That's what I'm gonna do. Thanks, mum. No they don't.

December 2017 Issue | Vol. 5, No. 25












 







 


 
 
 
 


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Dir of Culinary & Beverage
THE BOULDERS
CAREFREE, ARIZONA

BRIAN ARCHIBALD

  Executive Chef
SANCTUARY at
CAMELBACK MOUNTAIN
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

BEAU MCMILLAN

  Executive Sous Chef
THE HERMOSA INN 
PARADISE VALLEY, ARIZONA

ALEJANDRO MARTINEZ

  Beverage Director
THE HERMOSA INN 
PARADISE VALLEY, ARIZONA

BILL PARKER



Chef Millist shares his favorite destinations for downhill skiing on our —

 
HENDRICK'S GIN
with Mark Stoddard

WEST COAST AMBASSADOR 



     
LINCOLN  
A JW Steakhouse 
CAMELBACK INN
Scottsdale, Arizona

      
Montelobos Mezcal
with Iván Saldaña, PhD.
   
       
Tuscany & Piemonte Wines
with Gary Spadafore
Breakthru Beverage Group



View the wines, spirits, and beers chefs and sommeliers have paired with food featured in FOODIES WEST on our new page:



            


            


             

           
 
           
 
              
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Paul Millist | Executive Chef | JW Marriott Camelback Inn in Scottsdale, Arizona Shark attack! Paul Millist thinks it “a cool way to go”. The statement, macabre coming from anyone else but a dyed-in-the-wool Australian, made a classic fit with Millist’s Terre Australis Incognita heritage. The rest of the story: If you could bump into a group of the following goddesses— Goddesses? Wow— —Greek goddesses—which would it be? The Muses, which is inspiration; Fates, which decide your destiny; or The Graces, mirth, pleasure and good cheer. Which one would you want to bump into, and what would you ask of them? The second one. The Fates. Where am I going? What is my fate? What have you decided for me? I want to know that. People always say, if someone were to tell you when you would die, would you ever ask? I say, Damn right I would. What if they say something like— Shark attack. That’s a good way to go. It’s quick, right? I’ve got a funny feeling it wouldn’t be, but it’d be a cool way to go. I’m not a religious man, but if you’re up at the Pearly Gates, and they’re like, What happened to you? Shark attack, mate. Carry that man in. Pick his leg up. Yeah. This quintessential Down Under humor—described by the Australian government (no, really) as “dry, full of extremes, anti-authoritarian, self-mocking and ironic”—served him well while working with some of the world’s most demanding chefs. Chefs like Gordon Ramsey and Marco Pierre White. “I was very, very young,” Millist explained. “Very naive, certainly that’s for sure. I learned at high-end restaurants, most of the time, all of my working life. They were hard. And they were difficult places. They were the kind of places where you had to give it, but you had to be able to take it, as well. And you can take that anyway you want, but you’d get eaten alive if you didn’t stand your ground or you didn’t have that smart remark to give back. You’d just be eaten alive.” Which may explain the death-by-shark attack fantasy. Millist continued his thoughts, unabridged—another one of those enlivening Australian tendencies. “People today,” Millist observed, “I look at today’s next generation, and you know, If I finished seventh, I need a prize. You’re not getting a prize for seventh, all right? There are no prizes for seventh. But today’s generation, I want to know, what am I going to get? What am I doing? I never asked those questions back then. Yes, Chef, No, Chef. Three bags full, Chef. Is this right, Chef? No. I’m beaten. Do it again.” The tough luck attitude makes sense coming from someone who swam with the sharks—literally and figuratively—and lived to talk about it. But combined with his inborn traits, the mix has not failed to land Millist in Human Resources when left unchecked.