FOODIES WEST.COM         

  LINCOLN – A JW STEAKHOUSE
with Executive Chef Paul Millist
  

    JW MARRIOTT CAMELBACK INN

in Scottsdale, Arizona

The language of steak: "hot and sputtering from the griddle". 

December 2017 Issue | Vol. 5, No. 26
 
 
 
 

 
Dir of Culinary & Beverage
THE BOULDERS
CAREFREE, ARIZONA

BRIAN ARCHIBALD

  Executive Chef
SANCTUARY at
CAMELBACK MOUNTAIN
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

BEAU MCMILLAN

  Executive Chef
JW MARRIOTT CAMELBACK INN
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

PAUL MILLIST

  Executive Sous Chef
THE HERMOSA INN 
PARADISE VALLEY, ARIZONA

ALEJANDRO MARTINEZ


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Lincoln – A JW Steakhouse at Camelback Inn in Scottsdale, Arizona with Executive Chef Paul Millist Some types of meat have, over the years, acquired their own catchphrase. For instance: A chicken in every pot; High on the hog; Gamy; A lamb to the slaughter. But steak—whether generic grocery grade, tasty Aberdeen-Angus, or coddled Japanese Kobe—has its own language. Mark Twain could hardly fit it into a single sentence in his book, A Tramp Abroad: . . . an angel suddenly sweeping down out of a better land and setting before him a mighty porterhouse steak an inch-and-a-half thick, hot and sputtering from the griddle; dusted with fragrant pepper; enriched with little melting bits of butter of the most impeachable freshness and genuiness; the precious juices of the meat trickling out and joining the gravy, archipelagoed with mushrooms; a township or two of tender, yellowish fat gracing an out-lying district of this ample county of beefsteak; the long white bone which divides the sirloin from the tenderloin still in its place. The kitchen at Lincoln – A JW Steakhouse understands how to interpret said steak’s language. “This is what I like,” said executive chef Paul Millist about Lincoln’s fare. “I know about grilling steak.” No sous vede steaks here, Millist added. Nor “dehydrating and rehydrating”. “No, no, no, no, no,” Millist said. “Pretty much in the resort, that’s not what we do. And if you look at, actually, what’s in America right now, there’s very few places actually doing that stuff. It’s right at the very top, probably, only one-percent of diners in the United States. It’s this very, very small niche market. The steakhouses in the United States, arguably they probably feed forty-percent of the U.S. population.” So competition can get pretty tough. When faced with such a challenge, the best solution remains, as always, quality. Millist gets it. “We’ve got a high-end product,” Millist assured. “We’ve got quality staff, service team. Good management, great direction. I think we have an incredible view. A wonderful dining room.”