FOODIES WEST.COM         

 EXECUTIVE SOUS CHEF JOEY CAVARETTA
 

  FOUR
SEASONS SCOTTSDALE AT TROON NORTH
in Scottsdale, Arizona

  When you're in the kitchen, and when you're in any business, in general, you should be looking for ways to contribute to that business in a positive manner and looking for ways to improve yourself in a positive manner. Those should be your only two focuses. If you do that, you're going to succeed.

October 2017 Issue | Vol. 5, No. 17








 





 






 
 
 
 


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Executive Pastry Chef
THE BOULDERS
CAREFREE, ARIZONA

KEITH TAYLOR

 
Chef de Cuisine
HEARTH '61
PARADISE VALLEY, ARIZONA

ALFRED MURO

  Executive Sous Chef
MOUNTAIN SHADOWS 
PARADISE VALLEY, ARIZONA

CHRISTOPHER BRUGMAN

 
STRANGE CRAFT
BEER COMPANY

with Tim Myers

FOUNDER/HEAD BREWER 




Chef Cavaretta explains why Cubanos are the best cigars for chefs 
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M.F.K. FISHER
Food writer extraordinaire

     
THE GRILL 
Kitchen & Bar 
THE BOULDERS
Carefree, Arizona

     
VIVA XXXII Tequila
Democratizing Luxury

      
Montelobos Mezcal
with Iván Saldaña, PhD.


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Joey Cavaretta | Executive Sous Chef | Four Seasons Scottsdale Troon North in Scottsdale, Arizona Joey Cavaretta always wanted to work in the kitchen, thanks to Grandma Rose and Aunt Annette. The Cavaretta ladies, first- and second-generation Americans, have a Sicilian heritage with cooking embedded in their DNA. Cavaretta, born and raised in the town that created Buffalo Wings, connected with this. Food shows followed: Paul Prudhomme’s Always Cooking; Emeril Lagasse and Mario Batali on the Food Network—the latter became Cavaretta’s favorite chef, to date; and Martin Yan, who assured, If Yan can cook, so can you. Alton Brown, so to speak, bradded the nail. “[He] really broke down the science of the food,” Cavaretta said. “That really got my interest. That’s where that fire really began to grow. I decided, Alright I want to go to college for culinary arts.” Cavaretta started looking at culinary schools while his father kept an eye on the prices. Cavaretta chose Pennsylvania Culinary Institute, which cost, back in the day, $17,000. “My father’s like,” Cavaretta repeated his dad’s assessment, “Why don’t you go to Erie Community College? They have a culinary course there. See if it’s something you really enjoy. If it is, then you can go to the bigger, more well-known culinary school and get a degree from there.” Cavaretta decided to take his dad’s advice. He ended up paying “a grand total of $5,000” and landed a world-class career.