FOODIES WEST.COM         

 
DAVID SOLÓRZANO
CHEF DE CUISINE

CASINO DEL SOL
Tucson, Arizona

  I think probably my favorite moments in the kitchen are when we are extremely busy and everyone’s in the weeds but everybody’s still laughing.

August 2018 Issue | Vol. 6, No. 21














 










 
 

 
Executive Pastry Chef
HYATT REGENCY SCOTTSDALE

MARTIN NAKATSU

 
Executive Chef

CASINO DEL SOL TUCSON 
RYAN CLARK

      
James Beard Best Chef:
Southwest, Nobuo Fukuda


 
STOIC CIDER
with Founders Kanin Routson, PhD and Cody Routson, PhD

Prescott, Arizona


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THE LATIN TABLE
by Chef Isabel Cruz

Isabel's Cantina & Barrio Star

     
PY Steakhouse  
with Chef de Cuisine 
Roderick LeDesma
Tucson, Arizona

 
Uncommon Spirits from Well-known Brands 

GARY SPADAFORE
Breakthru Beverage AZ


 
Part 2: Uncommon Spirits from Well-known Brands 

GARY SPADAFORE
Breakthru Beverage AZ



View the wines, spirits, and beers chefs and sommeliers have paired with food featured in FOODIES WEST:



            


            


             

           
 
           
David Solórzano | Chef de Cuisine at UME | Casino del Sol in Tucson, Arizona David Solórzano’s family had him pegged. They called him a Picky Eater. Solórzano, who remembers differently, said he “always ate everything”. “My earliest memory was pickled pigs feet,” Solórzano said. “I used to like that. Obviously if I’m eating pickled pigs feet I’m not much of a picky eater. That’s my earliest childhood memory, watching my grandma making that.” Over the years, Solórzano’s palate progressed, but his childhood reputation died hard. When Solórzano took a trip with one of his aunts to his grandma’s hometown, Guadalajara, in 2005—two years after culinary school, mind you—his aunt hesitated at the dinner table. “Some things she would eat she wouldn’t give me any to taste,” Solórzano recalled. “Whenever I would ask about it to taste it, she’d say, Oh, you wouldn’t like it. But I want to try it! “Now I always try everything three times,” Solórzano continued, “even if I don’t like it the first time, I’ll give it two more shots. It could be an off night. Something could have happened, someone could have been pulled out from their station. Being in the industry, now, I know there’s a lot that could happen. Maybe you went the wrong day. Maybe you ordered the wrong thing. Maybe you thought you liked beets, but you really don’t. Because I was a picky eater then, I always try to give things a chance now. I do that with a lot of things, not just food.” A lot of things, like art, fishing, culinary school, running a food truck, working in fine dining, rock climbing, meditation. And Solórzano doesn’t take just the garden-variety interest in these things, but more intense, pickled pigs feet versions. Take, for instance, fishing. Solórzano didn’t share any stories about the lunker that got away while wading some trophy trout fishery. No, Solórzano headed up to Valdez, AK to work with halibut fishermen on a large boat.