FOODIES WEST.COM         

 BRIAN ARCHIBALD
  
Director of Culinary and Beverage
Chaîne des Rôtisseurs | Flay Slayer
THE BOULDERS RESORT
in Carefree, Arizona

  When we serve you Two Wash Ranch—a family that’s been here for sixty-five years and always have been farmers—when you have a dish that everything on the plate came from that farm, what can be more Arizona?

January 2018 Issue | Vol. 6, No. 1
















 

 




 
 
 
 


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  Executive Chef
THE HERMOSA INN 
PARADISE VALLEY, ARIZONA

JEREMY PACHECO

  Executive Chef
SANCTUARY at
CAMELBACK MOUNTAIN
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

BEAU MCMILLAN

  Executive Chef
JW MARRIOTT CAMELBACK INN
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

PAUL MILLIST

 
Executive Pastry Chef
THE BOULDERS
CAREFREE, ARIZONA

KEITH TAYLOR


Chef Archibald shared a "frightful experience" when he worked at Restaurant Daniel on our —

 
HENDRICK'S GIN
with Mark Stoddard

WEST COAST AMBASSADOR 



     
LINCOLN  
A JW Steakhouse 
CAMELBACK INN
Scottsdale, Arizona

  GM/Sommelier
LINCOLN STEAKHOUSE & 1936 BAR
JW MARRIOTT CAMELBACK INN

DAVID KENT
   
       
Tuscany & Piemonte Wines
with Gary Spadafore
Breakthru Beverage Group



View the wines, spirits, and beers chefs and sommeliers have paired with food featured in FOODIES WEST on our new page:



            


            


             

           
 
           
Brian Archibald | Director of Culinary and Beverage | The Boulders in Carefree, Arizona On the first day of Brian Archibald’s cooking class at Metro Tech High School on Phoenix, Arizona’s west side, he arrived late. He thinks. “So I walked in there,” Archibald recalled, “and there was an old French chef, as usual, as there should be, right? With his ponytail and all. I loved James Holman. Great guy in the Valley. “Anyways,” Archibald continued, “I walked in there. I think I was late. My first day. He gave me a very, very hard time about attendance and always being twenty minutes early, especially for cooking. He came from a very old school French background, if you will, with French kitchens and French brigade.” The class Archibald attended, part of the Careers Through Culinary Arts Program, started an unlikely career for the native Arizonan. He always helped his mom in the kitchen, but not cooking. His interest stopped with plating. “My mom was a home cook,” Archibald said, “but she cooked every single day. My mother’s background is Sicilian and Irish, and a lot of those flavors were in our foods, like anchovies and capers and olives. Fresh pasta. Those things stayed in me. I had that taste, but I didn’t know what it was.” But he did notice how much the details meant to him. So did his teacher, who wanted to include him in a competition. At first, he balked. “I’d been to a lot of competitions throughout my life,” Archibald explained. “I compete a lot. I really like it. So in this, it’s very much, Do you know how to make a French crepe? Do you know how to batch a chicken breast? And tournée vegetables? We’re all sixteen years old. Our instructors are trying to teach us this. I didn’t study a lot. I didn’t stay late and practice how to tournée vegetables.” Archibald “fared really well”; he won a scholarship to California Culinary Academy in San Francisco. With only a year left to go at Metro Tech, the event sealed his culinary fate. The then-sixteen-year-old got a job on the line at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Phoenix. With all the other thirty-five-year-old line chefs. “It was hilarious,” Archibald said. “I was their entertainment. They were just like, We’re going to teach you everything.” Starting with misery. “Of course,” Archibald said, “to me, it was amazing, right? Wow, what a great world this is.”