FOODIES WEST.COM         

 BILL PARKER

Wine Spectator's Best of Award of Excellence
Beverage Director 
LON's General Manager
THE HERMOSA INN
Paradise Valley, Arizona

As you get into nicer and nicer places, you realize that there really is a craft to it. It's a profession, and the people that do it really well are really impressive.
 

December 2017 Issue | Vol. 5, No. 24 



























 
 
 
 


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  Executive Chef
SANCTUARY at
CAMELBACK MOUNTAIN
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

BEAU MCMILLAN

  Executive Chef
JW MARRIOTT CAMELBACK INN
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

PAUL MILLIST

  Executive Sous Chef
THE HERMOSA INN 
PARADISE VALLEY, ARIZONA

ALEJANDRO MARTINEZ

 
Dir of Culinary & Beverage
THE BOULDERS
CAREFREE, ARIZONA

BRIAN ARCHIBALD



Bill Parker shares his experience creating a custom blend of Oregon Pinot Gris on our

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M.F.K. FISHER
Food writer extraordinaire

     
LINCOLN  
A JW Steakhouse 
CAMELBACK INN
Scottsdale, Arizona
   
       
Tuscany & Piemonte Wines
with Gary Spadafore
Breakthru Beverage Group


      
Ancho Reyes Verde
Roasted Poblano Chiles


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William Parker, Beverage Director/LON's General Manager at The Hermosa Inn, Paradise Valley, Arizona If Bill Parker were a wine, a subject in which he excels, he figures “a blend of some kind” would best describe him. Red or white? “I think it’d be red,” Parker said. “For me, red’s more expressive, and red varietals, when they come together, would be more expressive of who I am. They can be sharp and angular, or they can be soft and mellow, and I can be both of those things, certainly.” And, like a good wine, Parker’s vita shows he’s only gotten better. A career that started in the back of the house at a chain restaurant to earn enough cash to pay for college has developed into a passion strong enough to win top industry awards. Parker came from a family of ten kids whose dad played Dixieland jazz for a living. The the aspiring communications major often ended up going to school part-time while he worked in restaurants. “I thought I was going to get into radio,” Parker said. “Of course, I realized after a semester or two unless you’re going to work as a major personality at one of the major stations, you’re never going to get rich doing that.” Switching to the front of the house became the relevant way for Parker to make more money. Over time, the restaurants became “nicer and nicer”. After changing his majors “many, many times”, Parker ended up with a bachelor of science degree in business information systems. It only took a few months of interning with a small software designer for Parker to figure out “that that was not my life”. Not like those nice restaurants. He started to see the fine dining scene as a career, and not just a way to make money. “You realize that there really is a craft to it,” Parker said. “It is a profession, and the people that do it really well are really impressive. So, I aspired to that at the time. It’s always a little mercenary, because the better you are at it, the more you can make doing it. There really is an incentive to better yourself and your craft. By the time I was working in upscale resort restaurants, that’s what I was trying to do.” Starting with T. Cook’s, at the Royal Palms Resort in Scottsdale. The major player among the city’s destination restaurants had an intimidating staff.