FOODIES WEST.COM         
MIXOLOGIST TONY ESCALANTE
DUST CUTTER at RENAISSANCE PHOENIX DOWNTOWN, ARIZONA

They say, Never trust a skinny chef. I say,
July 2017 Issue | Vol. 5, No. 11                                                                  Never trust a quiet bartender.

















 












 
 
 
 


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Pastry Chef
MOUNTAIN SHADOWS
 PARADISE VALLEY, ARIZONA

SEAN BECK

AAA 4-Diamond
Executive Chef 
HOTEL VALLEY HO, SCOTTSDALE
RUSSELL LA CASCE

Executive Chef
OCEAN PRIME | PHOENIX, AZ
JAGGER GRIFFIN

     
VIVA XXXII Tequila
Democratizing Luxury


Tony Escalante shares what bartending and fishing have in common on our —


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Make your own Nocino with wild AZ walnuts!

     
Hearth '61
with Executive Chef Charles Wiley
MOUNTAIN SHADOWS
Paradise Valley, Arizona

     
Domaine de Cala Rosé
CHEF JOACHIM SPLICHAL


M.F.K. FISHER
Food writer extraordinaire


View the wines, spirits, and beers chefs and sommeliers have paired with food featured in FOODIES WEST on our new page:



            


            


             
 
           
 
              
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Tony Escalante | Mixologist | Renaissance Phoenix Downtown Arizona Every industry Tony Escalante has ever worked in, he has always risen to a higher level. He rose to management in retail, and he started the ranks to become a mechanic at Audi. But creating craft cocktails, Escalante discovered, is different. “No one’s excited to see what sale I’m going to put out for Bed, Bath and Beyond,” Escalante explained, “or what car I’m going to work on tomorrow, but everyone’s excited to see what we’re going to do next. You’ve already done this, and already done that. What’s coming next? I love that. Actually, it thrills me right now. I’m lovin’ every minute of it.” Maybe Escalante loves working behind the bar because he practically grew up in a bar? He and his cousin, only old enough to drink Roy Rogers kiddie cocktails, often sat at their grandmother’s bar in San Francisco while their moms worked as cocktail waitresses. “Her bar was called The Overflow,” Escalante said. “It was in the Tenderloin, the corner of Sutter and Hyde. An interesting little place. It doesn’t exist anymore. It’s now called ACES, a New York bar.” Escalante remembered the bar well. The sour smell of stale beer, the long ashes hanging at the end of the regulars’ cigarettes, the overwhelming smell from nicotine saturation, and running through the backdoor and down the stairs when the police came in. The bar, you might say, got into Escalante’s blood. “Yeah,” Escalante acknowledged. “Essentially. It’s kind of amazing to think that that place spawned this life.” This Life started when Escalante decided to leave the Bay Area, which was his family’s home for a several generations, and find his own way.