FOODIES WEST.COM         
GARY SPADAFORE
CERTIFIED WINE EDUCATOR | Director of Education, Breakthru Beverage Arizona
August 2016 Issue | Vol. 4, No. 15                                   Those promiscuous Napa Valley Chardonnays
 





 



 




 



 

 














 
 
 
 

4-Diamond Chef de Cuisine
  DESEO | WESTIN KIERLAND
SCOTTSDALE, AZ

DEREK BIAZO

Chef de Cuisine
THE ARTHUR J
MANHATTAN BEACH, CA

DANIEL WAKED

Executive Chef
CHAMINADE RESORT
SANTA CRUZ, CA

NICHOLAS CHURCH

      
Lead Sommelier
RITZ-CARLTON
HALF MOON BAY CA

TODD BRINKMAN

       
Andrew Steiner:
3 Rare Cheeses

     
Off The Beaten Track
WET BEAVER CREEK WILDERNESS
COCONINO NAT'L FOREST, AZ


     
SCOTTSDALE, AZ
Second Story Restaurant & Liquor Bar

      
Chocolate Stars USA
Cacao at its best!


Don't miss what's new at
FOODIES WEST!


Sign up for a free subscription!


            


            


             
 
           
 
              
               Like Us!
Gary Spadafore | Certified Wine Educator | Director of Education, Breakthru Beverage Arizona | Those promiscuous Napa Valley Chardonnays True, Chardonnay has a tendency to end up in the oh-so-vanilla category. And the more unctuous styles can cause a taste bud to swoon or a nose to wrinkle. But the ancient grape, that goes back at least 700 years, lands in some of the world’s best and most popular wines. Certified Wine Specialist Gary Spadafore calls Chardonnay one of the classic grapes of the wine world. “It is responsible for some of the greatest white wines in the world,” Spadafore said. “It is the most important white grape produced. It can produce $800-a-bottle wine, and it can produce the worst plonk you ever tasted. Depending, completely, on where it’s grown and who’s making it.” The totally terrier-driven grape adapts and thrives in may different regions. A good region produces good wine. "If it's grown in a warm climate," Spadafore gave details, "that will give you a style of Chardonnay that is more tropical, more ripe, more lush, meaning not a lot of acidity. Typically, the flavors of honey, and things like that. If it's grown in a cool climate, then you get the opposite of that. You get very, very crisp wine. Instead of tropical fruit, you get apple, pear, and citrus flavors. Oftentimes, if it's not naked, then you get more austere wine." Chardonnay’s classic home resides in the Champagne and Burgundy regions in France, with Burgundy the classic model. A richer style comes from Burgundy's warmer southern Mâconnais district, called Chardonnay. Burgundy's Chablis district in the north produces a more steely style with high acidity, and minerality. As discriminating as these regions can be about the wines produced in them, the grape from which the wines are produced isn’t. “Sometimes in my wine classes,” Spadafore said, “I call it a promiscuous grape. It will grow almost anywhere and make pretty good wine for anybody. But like other wine grapes, it has certain grower preferences that can produce classic wine if grown in the correct location by a good winemaker.” Napa Valley is one of those correction locations. Chardonnay, after all, played a huge part in putting Napa on the wine world's radar screen at a time when France ruled that world. Spadafore shared the “very interesting story."