FOODIES WEST.COM         
EXECUTIVE CHEF PAUL STEELE
COPPERWYND RESORT in FOUNTAIN HILLS, ARIZONA
                It’s about bringing something that’s been missing
February 2017 Issue | Vol. 5, No. 3                                                    that people want. Diners and kitchen.




 

 







 








 
 
 
 


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Executive Chef
WESTIN KIERLAND RESORT
CHRIS MASCO

Executive Sous Chef
HYATT REGENCY SCOTTSDALE
BRIAN CONTRERAS

Beverage Manager
HYATT REGENCY SCOTTSDALE
DAMON THOMPSON

      
FOOD LORE
FROM DESERT LANDS

Where food connects cultures.


Chef Steele talks about what might be behind the surprise Intermezzo  on our —


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Deep Nutrition
by Cate Shanahan, M.D.

Are you serving Phat Fat?

     
FLOURISH
  FOUNTAIN HILLS, ARIZONA
Good food that tastes good.

      
Yerba Santa: A GRAS flavoring's noble past

      
LOIRE VALLEY WINES
Three noteworthy labels.


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Paul Steele | Executive Chef | CopperWynd Resort | Fountain Hills, Arizona Every chef is different. But they all, Paul Steele remarked, ‘have their stubborn ways’. ‘They believe in their own ways,” Steele said, and then gave a ready example. “No, you can only stir risotto clockwise to get the best creamiest risotto.” So when, growing up, Steele spent time with his grandfather, a professional chef, cooking in the kitchen, he naturally picked up nuances of his grandfather’s style. ”Like making mashed potatoes,” Steele reminisced. “It was something so simple, but you sure can screw it up.” Steele, “obviously” considers it a waste of time not to come away with something from positions that he puts himself into. This includes the dolorous ones. From those, he learned what not to do. “I come to work everyday thinking I should learn something from everyone,” Steele said. “The day I stop learning is the day I should not show up. It’s really important to me, and I try to give that back to everyone that works for me. The patience, the training, the knowledge, because I was really fortunate that I had a lot of people that did that for me. “I’ve also worked for some people that I didn’t want to be like,” Steele added. “Going through those trials and tribulation, I was like, There’s no way I could do this to anyone. Because I didn’t like it myself.” On the other hand, Steele thinks everything a chef thinks they know when they walk into a new position has to “kind of” get thrown “out the door”. “You’re on someone else’s turf, so to speak” Steele explained, “and everyone has their own way of doing things.” You know, those stubborn ways. What about Steele’s?