FOODIES WEST.COM         
M.F.K. FISHER
AUTHOR: THE GASTRONOMICAL ME
LES DAMES D'ESCOFFIER INTERNATIONAL,  BEARD FOUNDATION AWARD-WINNER,
FOUNDER of NAPA VALLEY WINE LIBRARY
 . . . I saw food as something beautiful to be shared with
June 2017 Issue | Vol. 5, No. 9                                                                                    people instead of as a thrice-daily necessity.



























 
 
 
 


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AAA 4-Diamond
Executive Chef 
HOTEL VALLEY HO, SCOTTSDALE
RUSSELL LA CASCE

5-Star/5-Diamond Pastry Chef
 HOTEL VALLEY HO
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

AUDREY ENRIQUEZ

Executive Chef
PRIMO ITALIA | TORRANCE, CA
MICHELANGELO ALAGIA

Beverage Specialist
WESTIN KIERLAND RESORT SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA
MATTHEW ALLEN


M.F.K. Fisher's daughter, Kennedy Friede Golden, talks about Fisher's mischievous side on our


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HOTEL VALLEY HO
Scottsdale, Arizona

     
Southwest Foraging
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Domaine de Cala Rosé
CHEF JOACHIM SPLICHAL


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M.F.K. Fisher |Author: The Gastronomical Me Right about this time of the year, when stone fruits drip ripe from the trees, food writer M.F.K. Fisher had a sea change in the way she saw food. She, her sister, and her father had driven out of the California desert “into deep winding canyons before the sun went down.” They sat on a weathered bench, the two girls and their dad, “in the deep green twilight” to have what Fisher described as, “one of the nicest suppers I have ever eaten”. That night, with the golden hills and live oaks clearly fixed in her memory but the details of the food they ate faded, save for a peach pie “bursting with ripe peaches picked that noon” for dessert, Fisher wrote in her book, The Gastronomical Me, that she saw her dad “for the first time as a person”. The endearing dimpled details of her sister’s hands would forever move her. And she, for the first time, “saw food as something beautiful to be shared with people instead of as a thrice-daily necessity”. Fisher’s description of her life-changing experience that happened just short of a century ago remains a hallmark of her style and the reason for her success as one of the culinary world’s most outstanding writers. Fisher’s daughter, Kennedy Golden, explained. “When I read her words,” Golden said, “it brings up memories of my own life where I’ve enjoyed parallel experiences. I think she evokes a presence in life that is not available in a lot of other writing.” In actuality, Fisher had created a new genre. Instead of describing the stage, as food writers were wont to do up to that point, Fisher added people. She intertwined food with the human condition, most of the time her own. Since she lived through some major world-changing events, the resultant style just happened to appeal to many of her readers who were negotiating sea changes of their own.