FOODIES WEST.COM         
 EXECUTIVE CHEF KEN HARVEY:
Tell me I can't, and I will. Tell me I can go this
February 2015 Issue / Vol. 3, No. 3                                                 high and I'll go that high.













 






 
      
Chef de Cuisine 
Alexis Martinez
     
     
Certified Sommelier
Shaun Adams

      
February 2015
Chef's Larder

     
Kids in the Kitchen
Junior Leagues International

See how Ken Harvey and his son give back on FOODIES WEST's Facebook page.

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The rest of your body
on Rosemary


      
The Yunnan Cookbook
by Annabel Jackson
& Chef Linda Chia

       
The Flying V Bar & Grill
 


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Synopsis: Executive Chef Ken Harvey, Loews Ventana Canyon, Tucson, Arizona

Ken Harvey never wanted to do banquets. At all. But that’s where Master Chef Marc Ehrler, who’d just moved from South Beach to Tucson to buoy Loews’ former five-star restaurant, the Ventana Room, wanted him. At the time, 2007, Harvey was working with Chef Jason Joniloniss at Tucson’s Hacienda del Sol. Joniloniss brought him there to do banquets. “I told Jason I had no desire to do banquets,” Harvey said. “At all. I always did à la carte. Little did I know that was going to be the separational piece for success. I called the German guy back in Texas and said, What do you think about banquets? He said, If you want to make money at a hotel, work in banquets. And I said, OK. Great. Done.” That German guy back in Texas was Reinhard Warmuth. He owned the Woodbine Hotel & Restaurant in Madisonville where Harvey worked before he started culinary school at The Art Institute of Houston. “They wanted you to do three or four months of establishment before you started school,” Harvey explained. “I worked at Woodbine because it was the nicest thing I could find in the area. I walk in and there’s this old German guy in this old, classic Victorian bed and breakfast.” So Harvey started shucking oysters and cooking crab at Ritz Carlton’s Remington Restaurant where “everything,” he said, “ was done right.” At the time, Harvey didn’t understand the property had a management program, and he was on it. Harvey ended up touring the country with St. Regis, and worked at the Essex House in NYC, Laguna Nigel, and Aspen. When Harvey moved back to Tucson for a high school sweetheart, he went from making scratch consommés, breaking down lobsters, and working with the finest caviar, to a kitchen full of cooks who played games. “I ended up taking a job for a few weeks,” Harvey said, “and it sucked. So I went to Hacienda de Sol and was the banquet chef when I was 22 or 23, which was pretty young at the time.” Then Marc Ehrler came into town. Ehrler’s philosophy was Kaizen—consistent improvement every day—which totally changed the kitchen. People stopped drinking, smoking, “whatever” and began improving their lives and performance. Winter Vegetable Salad with butternut Squash, Pear, Beet Root, Pomegranates, Cauliflowers, Pea Tendrils, Sorrel, Carrots, Cilantro Blossom, Citrus-Olive Oil. Features a butternut squash puree as a base and a salad of roasted vegetables with a vinaigrette of olive oil and tangerine juice.