FOODIES WEST.COM         
  JESSE HANSEN'S GARDEN
So I work in a hotel, I have an office, I do paperwork, but I also get to come out to the
September 2015 Issue / Vol. 3, No. 16                                                              garden and have some adventures. It’s truly fun.





























     
Chef François de Mélogue

      
Executive Sous
Chef Justin Pfeilsticker

     
Chef de Cuisine
Brandon Dillon

     
 Certified Wine Educator Gary Spadafore:
 Red Blends Rsing


Jesse Hansen shares his other passions, besides cooking —

See what they are
 in our

Facebook page!

      
WILD HOPS:  The ingredient in microbrews grows wild in microclimates

     
Province Urban
  Kitchen & Bar

THE BEER BUFF!
     
Certified Cicerone
Ron Kloth
recommends choice brews for fall

     
deseo
 Nuevo Latino Cuisine



Don't miss what's new at
FOODIES WEST!


Sign up for our free newsletter!


            


            


             

           
 
           
 
              
               Like Us!
Jesse Hansen's Garden, Four Seasons Westlake Village, California
Gardens are glam. From raised beds to rows, rooftops to backyards—more and more chefs are growing their own ingredients and serving seed to table food. Jesse Hansen (FOODIES WEST September 2014) found out he inherited a mature garden when he got a new position last December. The former chef de cuisine at Four Seasons Scottsdale at Troon North, got promoted to executive chef of Four Seasons Westlake Village, California. “When I got here,” Hansen repeated his reaction, “I was like, I love it. Let’s go.” As garden life unfolded, Hansen learned about the things growing in each plot—a variety of chile peppers, corn, squash, tomatoes, watermelon, eggplant, herbs, peaches, figs, golden squash, zucchini, lavender, etc. He added “a couple hundred dollars” of seeds to the garden. The groundskeeper, Benji Zavala, starts the seeds in a redwood bin with a Plexiglas top to protect the seedlings from snails and bunnies. Then he transplants them where Hansen wants them. Hansen uses organic seeds as much as he can and no pesticides. “That’s it,” Hansen said. “It’s pretty straightforward.” And then there are the learning curves. The situations when the glam fades and the hard knocks begin. “The chef prior to me,” Hansen explained, “he had purchased a bunch of seeds, too. So I’m still working my way through some of the stuff that he planted. Every once in a while, something will appear that I didn’t have anything to do with, and I don’t even know what it is.”