FOODIES WEST.COM         
  ERIC GROSSMAN
June 2016 Issue | Vol. 4, No. 12             USA Today Food & Travel Expert | Author: Craft Spirits 



















 
 
 
 

Executive Chef
DOMA - MANHATTAN BEACH
KRISTINA MIKSYTE

Owner / Chef
BARAN'S 2239 - HERMOSA BEACH
TYLER GUGLIOTTA

Executive Chef
SECOND STORY - SCOTTSDALE
NICK RUSTICUS
 
Check out the craft spirit distillers included in Grossman's book featured in Foodies West:

High West
Letherbee
Spirit Works





       
Andrew Steiner:
3 Rare Cheeses

     
Primo Tucson
JW MARRIOTT TUCSON STARR PASS
Mind-expanding meals


     
Master Sommelier
THE PHOENICIAN
Greg Tresner/Salad Wines


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Eric Grossman | USA Today F+B Expert | Author: Craft Spirits No matter what, spirits affect the human spirit. But do craft spirits affect people differently than popular consumer brands? Food and beverage writer and author, Eric Grossman, thinks so. “I think consumers who are passionate about craft spirits will place a stronger focus on their ordering decisions and appreciation of the spirit,” Grossman said, “compared to those who place lesser, or no, thought regarding the specific brand when ordering spirits.” In other words, the passion that emanates from craft distillers tends to trickle down to the imbibers. So much so, the craft spirits industry has started to evolved and grow not unlike craft beers. In a more-to-come report from the Craft Spirits Data Project this spring, the nation has 1,280 active craft spirits producers. Annual growth between 2007 and 2015 was 15-percent—tripling between the bookend years. The number of craft distilleries is the highest since Prohibition. Grossman, one of USA Today’s food and wine experts, noticed. His interest in craft spirits grew, he said, in an organic sense, as he culled the cutting edge trends of the F+B world over the last decade. He could see more and more establishments expand their craft spirit offerings to keep up with customer demand. “We're talking about standard hotels and restaurants in mid-tier markets that previously wouldn't have offered a spirits list or cocktail program,” Grossman said. “Nowadays, rare is the respected restaurant or bar that doesn't place a focus on its spirits list or cocktail program.” The more exposure he had to leading producers and their products, the more he appreciated the products as well as the passion behind them. “The majority of distillers exhibit an intense commitment to detail and quality,” Grossman said. “Many I've spoken with are eager to express their extreme reluctance to compromise any aspect of their production process. “As with any F+B product,” Grossman added, “there's something to be said about quality and transparency, two factors that most craft spirits have in their favor over bigger, better-known competition.” And every craft spirits distiller has a story; often a compelling one. Grossman recently published a book about the whole scene titled, Craft Spirits. The first-of-its-kind book features more than 250 spirits made by pioneering distillers that use small-scale processes and the best ingredients. Craft Spirits includes a behind-the-scenes look at prominent distillers for almost every spirit category featured. This includes all major spirits—gin, vodka, brandy, cognac, tequila, whisky, bourbon, rye, rum—as well as some esoteric spirits.