FOODIES WEST.COM         
EXECUTIVE CHEF GREG DANIELS
ASHLAND HILL & MARGO'S in SANTA MONICA, CA
                                       You've got to be focused on the reason you're doing this is to make people happy It's why chefs do what
December 2016 Issue | Vol. 4, No. 22                                     they do. They have this need to please people.









 

 










 
 
 
 


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5-Star/5-Diamond
Executive Chef
FAIRMONT SCOTTSDALE PRINCESS
DAVID MORRIS

Sous Chef at Proof
FOUR SEASONS SCOTTSDALE
DELL MORRIS

Owner/Master Cicerone
  THE BRUERY & BRUERY TERREUX
ANAHEIM, CA

PATRICK RUE

DRAMBUIE
  with VANCE HENDERSON
A Living Liquid Legend

Greg Daniels shares the state of molecular gastronomy and using the techniques in his kitchen. See what he said on our —


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Autumn Cheese Pairings:
3rd in a triptych

     
ASHLAND HILL
  SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA
Not just another gin joint

     
HOT SAUCE NATION
A look the food industry's current hot product

      
GIN’S ANATOMY
GENIÈVRE, JENEVER, JUNIPER
What makes gin tick.


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Greg Daniels | Executive Chef | Ashland Hill & Margo's | Santa Monica, Callifornia Greg Daniels knows how he got his first job working in one of Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s restaurants in NYC. Vongerichten, who still gets fawning reviews after more than 30 years commanding the world’s top kitchens with star talent earning outstanding industry awards, had several restaurants in NYC at the time. Daniels set his sights on two: Spice Market in the Meatpacking District, and Perry Street in the West Village. “The one thing about New York is,” Daniels explained, “a lot of the people trying to get entry-level jobs are serious. They’ve gone to culinary school, they’re moving to New York to cut teeth. They’re trying to work for the best restaurant or chef that they possibly can. It’s competitive. If you’re trying to work at a one-Michelin star restaurant, it’s you and everyone else moving to New York trying to work at the best restaurant they can so they can build a career off of it.” Before that, Daniels, an upstate New Yorker from Buffalo, attended French Culinary School in SoHo, now renamed International Culinary Center. His favorite teacher was “the hardest guy”. “A chef named Xavier,” Daniels said. “A French guy who was real hard on you. I don’t remember his last name. It was, probably, ten years ago. He was this incredibly hardworking guy. He had two restaurants and teaching at the school. I don’t think he slept. I don’t think he saw his family much. But really passionate. He was great. “That school was great,” Daniels added. “It’s really cool. When I was choosing a culinary school, I had already gone to undergraduate. So I’d already been in college for, let’s call it, four years.” Majoring, he said, in accounting. How did that happen?