FOODIES WEST.COM         
CHEF DE CUISINE DEREK BIAZO
DESEO | WESTIN KIERLAND SCOTTSDALE,  ARIZONA
I think, us, as the younger generation of chefs, I think [textures] is
September 2016 Issue | Vol. 4, No. 16
                                                      one of our things, moving forward.

 
 
 
 

Executive Chef
CHAMINADE RESORT
SANTA CRUZ, CA

NICHOLAS CHURCH

Chef de Cuisine
THE ARTHUR J
MANHATTAN BEACH, CA

DANIEL WAKED

      
Lead Sommelier
RITZ-CARLTON
HALF MOON BAY CA

TODD BRINKMAN

       
Autumn Cheese Pairings:
1st in a triptych


Chef Derek
Biazo talks about the importance of humanely-raised proteins on our
  Facebook Page!


     
Pacific Resources Int'l
New Zealand Sea Salts
Manuka Honey


     
deseo restaurant
AT WESTIN KIERLAND
SCOTTSDALE, AZ


      
Ancho Reyes Verde
Roasted Poblano Chiles


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Derek Biazo | Chef de Cuisine | deseo at Westin Kierland | Scottsdale, Arizona Derek Biazo has always liked food. Mass quantities of it. Even as a youngster, he was, basically, eating all the time. “My parents,” the 6-foot five-inch chef said, “they couldn’t believe how much I could eat. Even more astounding was the type of food Biazo liked to eat. During family vacations to Mexico, he took a liking to the local cuisine. “Instead of playing on the beach,” Biazo said, “I would go into the kitchen or sit in the restaurant, Dad, can I get some shrimp cocktail? Some flan?” The Biazos used to drive from their Kingman, Arizona home into Mexico, through the state of Sonora, and stay in coastal areas like Guaymus, San Carlos, and Acapulco. “One of the reasons we’d go down there is my dad would go scuba diving with a bunch of his friends,” Biazo said. “They’d bring spiny lobster, octopus—whatever they’d catch—to the hotel’s kitchen, and the staff would cook it up for them. The first two nights we were there, I remember having charred octopus, shrimp cocktail and some really classic Mexican ceviche. I’ve always had an appetite.” That wasn’t the only reason the bottomless pit liked the food. He actually noticed nuances. “Not just the freshness of the fish,” Biazo said, “but the acidity and the richness and sweetness that you get from some of the shrimp and fish. And the textures. The fattiness and creaminess of the avocado.” Biazo fell in love with food when he went to Maine with his grandmother one summer. They stayed a month with her brother, Biazo’s great-uncle Rupert, who happened to be a foodie. “He always loved great wine with great food,” Biazo said. “The last week we were there, they were like, Hey, let’s go up to Quebec. They loved to travel and liked making the trip, about four-and-one-half hours away.” They stayed in Old Quebec for about four days and had, what Biazo described, “a non-stop food fest of breakfast, lunch and dinner.” One meal, in particular, cinched the knot. “When we got to dinner,” Biazo said, “they told me to dress up. I was only 14, but I thought it was great. I love doing this. They took me to the restaurant, and the meal was about four hours. I remember ordering escargot, the first time I ever had it, and I loved it. Great-Uncle Rupert wondered if his nephew might want to try a bite of his ris de veau, made with black truffle sauce and red wine. “I was like, Great, I’d love to try that,” Biazo said. “I took a bite, and I just remember going, Oh, I like this. This is it. My parents were completely surprised that I would like anything like that, and they were, too. After that first night, he’s like, We’re going out to dinner every night.” “I came back from there,” Biazo said, “and I was like, I want to do this. I didn’t know if I wanted to be a chef, per se, but I wanted to be involved in the kitchen or the restaurant with food. I wanted to be around that.”