FOODIES WEST.COM         
EXECUTIVE CHEF DELL MORRIS
FOUR SEASONS SCOTTSDALE AT TROON NORTH
December 2016 Issue | Vol. 4, No. 22                                                       I feel like food is the ultimate art.












 










 
 
 
 

5-Star/5-Diamond
Executive Chef
FAIRMONT SCOTTSDALE PRINCESS
DAVID MORRIS

Executive Chef
  ASHLAND HILL & MARGO'S
SANTA MONICA, CA

GREG DANIELS

Owner/Master Cicerone
  THE BRUERY & BRUERY TERREUX
ANAHEIM, CA

PATRICK RUE

DRAMBUIE
  with VANCE HENDERSON
A Living Liquid Legend


Dell Morris shares an experience from living self-sufficiently. See what he said on our —


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Autumn Cheese Pairings:
3rd in a triptych

     
ASHLAND HILL
  SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA
Not just another gin joint

     
HOT SAUCE NATION
A look the food industry's current hot product

      
GIN’S ANATOMY
GENIÈVRE, JENEVER, JUNIPER
What makes gin tick.


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Dell Morris | Sous Chef | Proof American Canteen at Four Seasons Scottsdale at Troon North | Scottsdale, Arizona Dell Morris will tell you that he grew up in an uncommon household. He lived with his dad and grandparents in tiny Fort Thomas, Arizona, current population 275. Hardly a hundred years had passed from the time the last bullet fired from the bawdy military outpost and the time Morris grew up there. By then, basketball, not brothels, was big. “That’s all we did,” Morris said. “Played basketball, camped, hunted, fished.” The self-contained household, located, Morris said, “in the middle of nowhere” in the Lower Sonoran Desert, hunted to eat. “I always had a great appreciation for wild game,” Morris said, “and I still do to this day. I don’t hunt anything I can’t eat.” And they had gardens. Full gardens with watermelon, cantaloupe, strawberries, tomatoes, and onions. They had peach, pecan, and pomegranate trees. “I grew up with all that good food,” Morris continued. “My grandmother would can it. She’s a great cook. We had a full pantry of all these fresh ingredients. From a young age, I knew the difference. I didn’t realize, like a professional cook, but I knew there was a big difference between how food tastes between organic and organically grown and had a lot of love into it and the food bought at the store.” But what he didn’t realize until later in life was the difficulty he’d have matching these flavors. “Nobody’s at home and nobody’s making these kinds of food,” Morris said, “from a pantry at home. To this day, I try to find those flavors, which is hard to do unless you have your own garden. It’s a lot of work to get those flavors.” He also didn’t realize how much this food impacted him.