FOODIES WEST.COM         
EXECUTIVE CHEF CHRIS MASCO
WESTIN KIERLAND RESORT in SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA
                Kitchens are like sports. Can’t do anything without teamwork.
March 2017 Issue | Vol. 5, No. 4                                                                  It’s high pressure all the time.






 



 







 












 
 
 
 


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Executive Sous Chef
HYATT REGENCY SCOTTSDALE
BRIAN CONTRERAS

Beverage Manager
HYATT REGENCY SCOTTSDALE
DAMON THOMPSON

Executive Chef
COPPERWYND RESORT
FOUNTAIN HILLS, ARIZONIA

PAUL STEELE

      
FOOD LORE
FROM DESERT LANDS

Where food connects cultures.


Chef Masco talks about seafood in Boston & Ireland on our —


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DESERT SPRING
ARIZONA'S SONORAN DESERT
Wine & Cheese
in the poppies.


     
Nellie Cashman's
Monday Club Café
WESTIN KIERLAND SCOTTSDALE

     
ALTO ristorante e bar
with Chef de Cuisine Christian Brady
HYATT REGENCY SCOTTSDALE

      
Yerba Santa: A GRAS flavoring's noble past


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Chris Masco | Executive Chef | Westin Kierland Scottsdale Resort | Scottsdale, Arizona Chris Masco’s family fell into two major categories. One was sports. His dad was an athletic director scouted, in his younger days, by the Dallas Cowboys. His grandfather, George Armstrong, played with the Philadelphia (now Oakland) Athletics when Connie Mack managed the team. Masco, himself, has the build of a football player, and he excelled in sports. So how did he end up a chef? “My knees got bad,” Masco said, “and that ended that. I played sports my whole life. All the way through college. A catcher in baseball. When my basketball was done and my baseball and soccer, it was, What do you do next?” Answer: The family’s other major category—food. His Irish mother was, he said, “the cook of everything” and his father “the griller”. His mom’s mom was “probably one of the best cooks”. “My mom learned through her,” Masco said. “She makes a tomato sauce that can’t be beat.” Pasta was big in the Masco household. “Being Italian,” Masco said, “that’s all we ever ate. When I went to Thanksgiving, I didn’t have turkey. I ate meatballs and sausage and lasagna. That was my dad’s side. My mom’s side did everything the right way. The American way.” Masco, also, worked at a restaurant—Italian, of course—during college. He worked under four chefs during the three years he worked there. “A German guy,” Masco recounted his experience, “French guy, Italian guy, and an American guy. I started as a dishwasher. I was a dishwasher for about three weeks and became the prep cook. The prep cook walked out and—Okay, you’re the prep cook. Then I worked through each station, salad, fry station. Then you finally graduate and become sauté.” Pete, the American chef, ended up opening his own restaurant with a couple of colleagues. They called it JPN’s—Jim, Pete, and Nick. “So I went with to work with them,” Masco said. “They were all Johnson and Wales graduates. They were saying, Go the Johnson and Wales way, and I was saying I’m going the CIA way. Why CIA? “Number one school in the country,” Masco answered without hesitation. “Great reputation. If you go there and make it, you can make it anywhere.”