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 BEYOND ASIAN FUSION:
                                                       Executive Chef Charles Wiley prepares his signature recipe: March 2015 Issue / Vol. 3, No. 6                                               Salmon with the Flavors of Soy, Sesame & Ginger

















 





 
      
Executive Pastry Chef 
Vanessa Johnson
 
       
Executive Chef 
Kareem Shaw

     
Chef Michael Vargas

      
March 2015
Chef's Larder

    
Read Foodies West's Interview with
Chef Chuck Wiley


          
Lavender: Need some Alpha with your Beta?

       
CORE Kitchen & Wine Bar

      
Limoncello di Capri

      
Jared Sowinski
Director of Beverage

       
Chef Wiley's Duck Salad
See how he made it!


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Synopsis: Executive Chef Charles Wiley prepares his signature dish, Seared Salmon with the flavors of Soy, Sesame & GingerHotel Valley Ho, Scottsdale, Arizona
Executive Chef Chuck Wiley, Hotel Valley Ho, Scottsdale, Arizona, turns the big, bold flavors of Asian Fusion cuisine into something harmonious. Something beyond Asian Fusion. After “always hanging around” and doing a stage in the late Barbara Tropp’s restaurant, China Moon Café in San Francisco, he got inspired to create the recipe below. Tropp used local and seasonal ingredients in her Chinese dishes. Her book, The Modern Art of Chinese Cooking, is considered by the James Beard Foundation one of the 20 essential to a culinary library “One of my signature dishes is Salmon with the Flavors of Soy, Sesame and Ginger,” Wiley said. “Something I developed when I lived in the Bay Area. It incorporates two sauces—one is soy-based and the other a ginger beurre blanc—and some interesting ingredients like mirin and somen noodles.” Wiley created the recipe in 1987 when he worked at a little hotel in Menlo Park, California called the Stanford Park. It took him about four years to perfect it. The recipe is, basically, a production. “It really is,” Wiley admitted. “When I teach this recipe at the culinary school, I mention to everybody, Try not to make it all at once. If you make it, like the Asian Sauce we’re going to make, make that up to two days in advance and put it in the fridge. And the day of, you’ve got your butter sauce and your vegetables and then you’re done.” Recipe:Salmon, Asian Sauce, Ginger Butter Sauce