FOODIES WEST.COM         
Basil Pesto by Chef Jenn Louis with Trofie
      
BACKGROUND LOW DOWN:

Since we're featuring pinyon pine on our FORAGING page, especially pine nuts, we decided to ask a chef for a recipe for pesto. But which one? The Pacific Northwest felt right, and Jenn Louis sounded right. We think you'll agree, she's a great fit. Check out her recipe below.

ON TO THE KITCHEN. . .


  STEP #1:
   THE CHEF







Jenn Louis:

Top Master Chef

Conde Nast "Hot Lister"

Food & Wine's Best New Chef 2012
for Northwest Region

James Beard Best Chef Northwest semi-finalist 2010, 2011

Co-owner/chef (with husband David Welch) of Lincoln Restaurant, Sunshine Tavern, and Culinary Artistry (catering) in Portland, Oregon








  
    







JENN SAYS:

The pesto, a traditional sauce from Genoa, is a favorite on trofie, a small dumpling-type noodle from the same area. There are many traditions with making  pesto, perhaps my favorite is a thick sauce that is not too oily nor too stiff. Just enough olive oil to make a great paste.






  STEP #2:  THE PINE NUTS

                                                          
DIY:

  • HARVEST PINYON PINE CONES IN SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER.
  • PLACE GREEN CONES IN A PAPER BAG AND CURE IN A WARM ROOM; CONES WILL OPEN IN ABOUT 3 WEEKS.
  • PLUCK OUT SEEDS.
  • CRACK OPEN & SHUCK.
  • KEEP UNUSED NUTMEATS IN THE FREEZER TO AVOID MOLD.



               


BYOB:

       Buy Your Own Bag       



 STEP #3:  THE TROFIE PASTA


DIY:

  • MAKING TROFIE IS FUN, BUT AS TEDIOUS AS CRACKING PINE NUTS.
  • BE SURE TO START FORMING THE TROFIE PASTA TWO HOURS BEFORE YOU PLAN TO COOK THEM.

                        

  
BYOB:

                 Buy Your Own Bag                   

  THE RECIPES:

Basil Pesto by Jenn Louis
(Yield 2 Cups)

1/2 cup pine nuts, untoasted (2.5 ounces)
1-1/2 teaspoon salt
2 medium cloves garlic, peeled
4-1/2 cups basil leaves (4.5 ounces)
1/4 cup Pecorino-Romano, finely grated and loosely packed
3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Blend pine nuts, salt, and garlic in a food processor with a sharp blade until finely chopped. Scrape down sides of food processor bowl; add basil, cheese, and 1/2 cup of the olive oil.  Blend, scrape down sides of bowl.  Add remaining 1/4 cup olive oil with food processor running until pesto has reached the desired consistency.  Scrape down sides of bowl several times during process. All ingredients in pesto should be gently chopped and held together by the oil without being runny.



  
            





 

                                  
                                   Forming trofie pasta may take some
                                   practice, and certainly some time.




Trofie Pasta by Foodies West Test Kitchen
Makes 4 servings

 3 cups all-purpose flour          2 teaspoons sea salt          1 cup water

Whisk together flour and salt. Using an electric blender on low speed with a dough hook, slowly add water until the dough forms into a ball. Add more water--in tiny increments--if needed. Knead dough until smooth (about 5 minutes). Flatten the dough into a disk, wrap and refrigerate for an hour.

A couple hours before you're ready to cook, start forming the trofie. Tear flattish, thumbnail-sized pieces of dough for each noodle. To roll the dough into the twisted trofie shape, open one hand, place a piece of dough on the lower palm held in place by the 3 middle fingers of the other hand, and then slide that hand with enough pressure for the dough to shape into a squiggly cylinder. Repeat, rolling in the same direction, another time or two to achieve the thin (about 3/8-inch wide), twisted trofie shape. The ends should be thinner than the middle. Place each noodle on a baking sheet lightly dusted with flour.

To cook, bring 2 quarts of salted water to a rolling boil. Add trofie. When the noodles rise to the top, cook for about a minute longer; drain.