FOODIES WEST.COM         
 CHEF/RESTAURATEUR/SOMMELIER/FARMER:
 AMY BINKLEY
If I put effort into it, I can learn something new everyday that I come into work.
July 2015 Issue / Vol. 3, No. 13                 I don’t think a lot of people can say that about their profession.
















      
Chef de Cuisine
Richard Garcia


      
Chef Roberto
Madrid's Kitchen

      
July 2015
Chef's Larder

     
Gary Spadafore
Certified Wine Educator

Amy Binkley shares the most important element for success in the chef's kitchen—

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Cool it with
Hibiscus Flowers

     
Café Zuzu:
Scottsdale, Arizona
       
     
Wright's at the Biltmore:
Phoenix, Arizona
 
     
Herbs & Spices
by Jill Norman

      
Q Tonic
Quinine Tonic Water


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Chef/Restaurateur/Sommelier/Garmer: Amy Binkley - Binkley's Restaurant, Bink's Midtown, Bink's Cafe
Growing up in central Pennsylvania, where small towns and big backyard gardens are common, Amy Binkley didn’t have any inspiration to cook. Her family didn’t go out to dinner very often, and her mom did most of the cooking. “She made a lot of things from scratch,” Binkley said. “We had a big garden. We did a lot of canning and preserving and fed ourselves. That’s the way my parents grew up, and that really carried over into our childhood. And so, I appreciated that.” When she went to college, Binkley got a degree in Liberal Arts because, she said, she still didn’t know what she wanted to do. The clues came after she graduated from college, and she started working as an innkeeper at a bed and breakfast. “That really got me more interested in cooking,” Binkley said. “When I was done with that gig, I got a job as a breakfast cook at another bed and breakfast. They taught me how to do restaurant-style work. That’s when I started really loving it.” She originally planned to save her salary to go to graduate school. All of a sudden, cooking started to make sense. “Actually,” Binkley explained, “I wanted to teach outdoor skills to kids, like NOLS or Outward Bound. But I loved cooking. I thought it was great. I didn’t have to go to school, and I could learn something everyday that I go to work. That still holds true today. If I put effort into it, I can learn something new everyday that I come into work. I don’t think a lot of people can say that about their profession.” This learning something new became an understatement at The Inn at Little Washington, one of the country’s best restaurants.